Of Sacrifices and Apologies

The oath to be taken by the president on first entering office is specified in Article II, Section 1, of the Constitution. It reads as follows:

I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States.

Nowhere does it read “I will apologize to every nation in the world for any actions taken by America against them, even if the action saved American lives.”

From investors.com:

Leaked cables show Japan nixed a presidential apology to Hiroshima and Nagasaki for using nukes to end the overseas contingency operation known as World War II. Will the next president apologize for the current one?

The obsessive need of this president to apologize for American exceptionalism and our defense of freedom continued recently when Barack Obama’s State Department (run by Hillary Clinton) contacted the family of al-Qaida propagandist and recruiter Samir Khan to “express its condolences” to his family.

Khan, a right-hand man to Anwar al-Awlaki, was killed along with Awlaki in an airstrike in Yemen on Sept. 30. We apologized for killing a terrorist before he could help kill any more of us.

It’s yet another part of the world apology tour that began with Obama taking the oath of office to protect and defend the United States and its Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic, something he immediately felt sorry for.

One stop on his tour was Prague in August 2009. There he spoke of “America’s commitment to seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons,” ignoring that before 1945 we lived in such a world and it was neither peaceful nor secure.

Another stop on the tour was in Japan, where Obama in November 2009 bowed to the emperor, something no American president had ever done. It could have been worse if plans to visit Nagasaki and Hiroshima to apologize for winning the war with the atom bombs had come to pass.

A heretofore secret cable dated Sept. 3, 2009, was recently released by WikiLeaks. Sent to Secretary of State Clinton, it reported Japan’s Vice Foreign Minister Mitoji Yabunaka telling U.S. Ambassador John Roos that “the idea of President Obama visiting Hiroshima to apologize for the atomic bombing during World War II is a ‘nonstarter.’”

There were two Theaters of War during World War II. The Pacific Theater, and the European Theater, where one of the largest invasions ever recorded occurred on June 6, 1944.

There has never been an exact count of the sacrifices made on D-Day. Although, it is estimated that more than 425,000 Allied and German troops were killed, wounded, or went missing during the battle. 209,000 of those who lost their lives were Allied forces. In addition to almost 200,000 German troops killed or wounded, the Allies also captured 200,000 soldiers. Captured Germans were sent to American prisoner-of-war camps at the rate of 30,000 per month, from D-Day until Christmas 1944. Between 15,000 and 20,000 French civilians were killed during the battle.

Basically, the successful invasion of Normandy was due to sheer force of numbers. By July 1944, some one million Allied troops, mostly American, British, and Canadian, were entrenched there. During the great invasion, the Allies assembled nearly three million men and stored 16 million tons of arms, munitions, and supplies in Britain.

Among the young men who stepped off those boats in a hail of gunfire was a fellow named Edward, whom everyone called Ned, from the small town of Helena, Arkansas. Already in his young life, Ned had been forced to drop out of school in the sixth grade, in order to work at the local movie theater to help support his mother, brother, and sister faced with the ravages of the Great Depression.

He was a gentle man who loved to laugh and sing, having recorded several 78 rpm records in the do-it-yourself booths of the day. Now a master sergeant in an Army engineering unit, she found himself stepping off a boat into the unknown, watching his comrades mercilessly gunned down around him.

Ned, along with the rest of his unit who survived the initial assault, would go on to assist in the cleaning out of the concentration camps, bearing witness to man’s inhumanity to man.

The horrors he saw had a profound effect on Ned. One that he would keep to himself for the remainder of his life. While his children knew that he served with an engineering unit in World War II, they did not know the full extent of his service, until they found his medal, honoring his participation in the invasion of Normandy, going through his belongings after he passed away on December 29, 1997.

How do I know so much about Ned? He was my father. You see, my love of Christ and of this country comes from my earthly father, 40 years my senior.

I was raised by the Greatest Generation.

Just the thought of this proposed action by the 44th President of the United States dishonors all those who served our country and worked so hard and sacrificed so much to win World War II, at home and abroad.

President Obama should be ashamed of himself for attempting to apologize for an act that saved countless untold American lives.

But he’s not.

Share
This entry was posted in Politics and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Of Sacrifices and Apologies

  1. RoseAnn says:

    Actually he has lived up to his oath to “execute” the office of the President of the United States. He has done his best to indeed “kill” the office in every way possible.