Hot Chicks and Their Thundersticks

Perhaps Freudian analysts can tackle this one, but in my humble opinion there is something ineffably sexy about a good looking woman cradling a firearm. Perhaps it’s the combination of beauty and lethal force, where both beauty AND bullets kill the beast. In the case of a mother cradling her toddler in one arm and holding a shotgun in her other hand, I suppose the image is attractive because it represents a woman at her most powerful: mother and defender.

These and other images may be found in Lindsey McCrum’s new book, “Chicks With Guns” (Vendome Press, $45) – a photo essay that leaves some people (liberals, self-hating females, self-hating Americans and eunuchs) a tad queasy:

“‘Chicks with Guns’ is filled with images that are strikingly beautiful, yet often have a haunting or unsettling quality,” writes former federal prosecutor Stephen L. Meager, in an essay that introduces the book. “In our time, few subjects provoke the range of emotions that guns do. Thoughts as varied as policies to prevent violent crime, the romance of the Old West, and even the implications of children playing with toy guns come to mind. No matter what images are evoked, the reality is that in this country, fifteen to twenty million women own guns. The sight of women with ostensibly deadly weapons (they are actually unloaded) challenges our preconceptions about the female or maternal role.”

Meager. What an appropriate name. But enough of this Alan Alda metrosexual.

It’s time to take a gander at hot chicks and their thundersticks:

Alexandra and Truett, Houston, TX. Ithaca 20-gauge side-by-side. “Guns, like everything in my childhood home, were considered treasures and works of art.”

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Ashton, Atwater, CA. Colt .45 double-action New Service revolver & Ruger .44 Magnum single-action revolver. “Ever since I was little, I remember I was learning how to shoot and how to aim.”

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Allie, Roseburg, OR. DWM Luger military model of World War I period, in 9mm Parabellum. “I think it’s a shame that more people, and especially women, have not known the positive impact shooting can have. Guns aren’t all about violence. Guns can be about finding confidence and gaining a sense of accomplishment.”

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Courtney, Houston, TX. Yildiz 20-gauge. “When my four-year-old son is playing with a play gun, it gives me the opportunity to teach him about gun safety.”

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Jamie, Loomis, CA. .44 Magnum Ruger Super Redhawk double-action revolver. “The Ruger means business, there’s no question about it. It’s menacing looking.”

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Morgan, Pray, MT. .17 H.M.R Savage Model 93R17 bolt-action rifle with AccuTrigger, fitted with a Bushnell 3x-9x Leupold scope. “Usually I have a more powerful rifle than a .17 in my hand. After all, that’s a gopher gun!”

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Lynn, Houston, TX. Sako .308 bolt-action rifle with scope. “It wasn’t until after I was married that I started hunting.”

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Pamela, Monte Sereno, CA. Freedom Arms .454 Casull. “I’ve had several men mention to me that the .454 Casull kicks too much for them. My response is that they’re fighting it too much.”

My response is that they are wimps. There is no firearm in existence that “kicks too much” for a real man – or a real woman, like this one:

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6 Responses to Hot Chicks and Their Thundersticks

  1. NeverGiveUp says:

    Awesome commercial. Was that Barb?

  2. josephine says:

    That is wild!! I would want to look like that one with the long skirt! I need a new outfit to wear with my 38 special (with a narrow grip)!

    • HeleneH says:

      where did you get it Josephine? The 38′s I tried the grip was too big, I have really small hands.

  3. HeleneH says:

    We should make a calendar Hot Tea Party Chicks with Thunder Sticks

  4. Kenny says:

    I’ll take the pictures. :)