Obamacare: Supreme Court Bound

C’mon, Supreme Court.  Let’s kick it into gear.  Time is of the essence.

The crowning achievement of the presidency of Barack Hussein Obama and the Democratic Party, the National Health Care Law, known as Obamacare, is headed for a rendezvous with destiny.

 Politico.com reports that:

The Obama administration chose not to ask the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals to re-hear a pivotal health reform case Monday, signaling that it’s going to ask the Supreme Court to decide whether President Barack Obama’s health reform law is constitutional.

The move puts the Supreme Court in the difficult position of having to decide whether to take the highly politically charged case in the middle of the presidential election.

The Justice Department is expected to ask the court to overturn an August decision by a panel of three judges in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals that found the law’s requirement to buy insurance is unconstitutional. The suit was brought by 26 states, the National Federation of Independent Business, and several individuals.

Since the ruling, the Justice Department had until Monday to ask the entire 11th Circuit to review the case. Administration lawyers didn’t file the paperwork by the 5 p.m. deadline, so the ruling would stand unless the Justice Department asks the Supreme Court to step in.

The petition isn’t due until November, and the administration could get an extension.

Opponents of the law had expected the government to ask for the so-called en banc hearing to delay a ruling by the Supreme Court.

America’s physicians, who know a lot more about America’s Health Care System than Obama ever will, have deserted the flagship association of their profession, due to its support of the Frankenstein Monster known as Obamacare.

Per Forbes.com:

According to a new survey, the majority of doctors do not believe that the AMA represents their views and interests. Much of that dissatisfaction stems from the organization’s support for President Obama’s contentious health care reform package.

That shouldn’t be surprising. The AMA declares that its core mission is to “help doctors help patients.” But ObamaCare undermines that pursuit by making life harder for physicians and driving down the quality of care available to patients.

The survey — conducted by physician recruitment firm Jackson & Coker — is a brutal indictment of both the AMA and ObamaCare. Just 13% of doctors agree with their trade association’s support of the health reform law.

Some doctors are even dissociating themselves from the AMA. Of those who have terminated their membership, 47% cited the organization’s continued backing of the health care law as the primary reason. Increasingly doctors are turning to associations like Docs4PatientCare and the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons that actually do represent their interests.

The Jackson & Coker survey joins a large stack of research with similar findings. In February, the National Physicians Survey discovered that more than three times as many doctors believed that the quality of American health care would “deteriorate” rather than “improve” under ObamaCare. Nine of ten physicians think ObamaCare will have a negative impact on their profession.

There’s no doubt that it will.

To jog your memory as to what a monstrosity of governmental bureaucracy Obamacare is, here is a brief overview of the timeline for the implementation of Obamacare, from a pdf prepared by the House Ways and Means and Energy and Commerce Committees on April 2, 2010. 

Let’s pick up the timeline with this year:

2011

  • Bringing Down the Cost of Health Care Coverage.
  • Strengthening Community Health Centers and the Primary Care Workforce.
  • Increasing Reimbursement for Primary Care.
  • Increasing Training Support for Primary Care.
  • Improving Health Care Quality and Efficiency. Establishes a new Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation to test innovative payment and service delivery models to reduce health care costs and enhance the quality of care provided to individuals.
  • Improving Preventive Health Coverage.
  • Improving Transitional Care for Medicare Beneficiaries.
  • Expanding Primary Care, Nursing, and Public Health Workforce.
  • Increasing Access to Home and Community Based Services.
  • Reporting Health Coverage Costs on Form W-2: Requires employers to disclose the value of the benefit provided by the employer for each employee’s health insurance coverage on the employee’s annual Form W-2.
  • Standardizing the Definition of Qualified Medical Expenses. Conforms the definition of qualified medical expenses for HSAs, FSAs, and HRAs to the definition used for the itemized deduction. An exception to this rule is included so that amounts paid for over-the-counter medicine with a prescription still qualify as medical expenses.
  • Increased Additional Tax for Withdrawals from Health Savings Accounts and Archer Medical Savings Account Funds for Non-Qualified Medical Expenses.
  • Cafeteria Plan Changes.

2012

  • Encouraging Integrated Health Systems.
  • Linking Payment to Quality Outcomes.
  • Reducing Avoidable Hospital Readmissions. Directs CMS to track hospital readmission rates for certain high-volume or high-cost conditions and uses new financial incentives to encourage hospitals to undertake reforms needed to reduce preventable readmissions, which will improve care for beneficiaries and rein in unnecessary health care spending.

Can you say “here come the Death Panels”?

2013

  • Payments to Primary Care Physicians. Requires that Medicaid payment rates to primary care physicians for furnishing primary care services be no less than 100% of Medicare payment rates in 2013 and 2014.
  • Administrative Simplification. Health plans must adopt and implement uniform standards and business rules for the electronic exchange of health information to reduce paperwork and administrative burdens and costs.
  • Encouraging Provider Collaboration. Establishes a national pilot program on payment bundling
  • Limiting Health Flexible Savings Account Contributions.
  • Increased Threshold for Claiming Itemized Deduction for Medical Expenses.
  • Medical device excise tax. Establishes a 2.3 percent excise tax on the sale of a medical device by a manufacturer or importer.
  • Limiting Executive Compensation.
  • Fee for patient-centered outcomes research.

2014

  • Reforming Health Insurance Regulations.
  • Eliminating Annual Limits.
  • Ensuring Coverage for Individuals Participating in Clinical Trials.
  • Establishing Health Insurance Exchanges. Opens health insurance Exchanges in each State to individuals and small employers. This new venue will enable people to comparison shop for standardized health packages. Local hack politicians are lining up for jobs right now.
  • Providing Health Care Tax Credits.
  • Ensuring Choice through Free Choice Vouchers.
  • Promoting Individual Responsibility.
  • Small Business Tax Credit.
  • Quality Reporting for Certain Providers.
  • Health Insurance Provider Fee. Imposes an annual, non-deductible fee on the health insurance sector allocated across the industry according to market share.

2015

  • Continuing Innovation and Lower Health Costs. Establishes an Independent Payment Advisory Board to develop and submit proposals to Congress and the private sector aimed at extending the solvency of Medicare, lowering health care costs, improving health outcomes for patients, promoting quality and efficiency, and expanding access to evidence-based care.
  • Paying Physicians Based on Value Not Volume. Creates a physician value-based payment program to promote increased quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries.

2018

Excise tax on high cost employer-provided health plans becomes effective. Tax is on the cost of coverage in excess of $27,500 (family coverage) and $10,200 (single coverage), increased to $30,950 (family) and $11,850 (single) for retirees and employees in high risk professions.

According to the “experts”, it appears very likely that the Supreme Court will agree to hear the case.

They’d better do it quickly….while America still has the finest health care system in the world.

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